Italian Numbers: one, two, three…

Could you imagine what life would be like without knowing any numbers? How would you tell your age, your telephone number, or your birthday?! If you’ve ever wanted to learn numbers in Italian then you’re in luck — because we’ve made this lesson just for you and are going to teach you all of them!

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Numbers in Italian

Let’s break it down into categories:

One digit numbers

0 zero
1 uno
2 due
3 tre
4 quattro
5 cinque
6 sei
7 sette
8 otto
9 nove

 

“Irregular” two digit numbers

11 undici
12 dodici
13 tredici
14 quattordici
15 quindici
16 sedici
17 diciassette
18 diciotto
19 diciannove

 

Two digit numbers with zero 

10 dieci
20 venti
30 trenta
40 quaranta
50 cinquanta
60 sessanta
70 settanta
80 ottanta
90 novanta

 

In order to form all other numbers, that is “regular” two digit numbers, there’s sort of a rule: you have to join one of the “two digit numbers with zero with one of the one digit numbers, by making somewhat of an “addition“.

20 + 5 = venticinque (25)

40 + 7 = quarantasette (47)

60 + 9 = sessantanove (69)

70 + 4 = settantaquattro (74)

… and so on.

BE CAREFUL: the numbers ONE (1) and EIGHT (8) start with a vowel. So in order to join them with any of the “two digit numbers with zero (which all END with a vowel), you must remember NOT to pronounce (nor write) the final vowel of the “two digit number with zero”. Here are some examples:

20 + 1 = ventuno (21)

30 + 8 = trentotto (38)

60 + 1 = sessantuno (61)

See how the vowel gets chopped off where the two numbers join together?

Now let’s move to…

Three digit numbers with two zeros

100 cento
200 duecento
300 trecento
400 quattrocento
500 cinquecento
600 seicento
700 settecento
800 ottocento
900 novecento

 

As you can see all three digit numbers with two zeros are formed by joining the one digit number + cento. The only exception is the number one-hundred itself, which is simply cento.

In order to form all other three digit numbers you just do another “addition” like we did before. Here are some examples:

100 + 50 + 4centocinquantaquattro (154)

300 + 20 + 5 = trecentoventicinque (325)

700 + 90 + 8 = settecentonovantotto (798)

 

Finally, here we have the four digit numbers with three zeros. In order to form them, you simply join the one digit number to the word “mila“. The only exception is the number 1000 itself (which is just “mille“). Here’s the list:

2000 duemila
3000 tremila
4000 quattromila
5000 cinquemila
6000 seimila
7000 settemila
8000 ottomila
9000 novemila

 

For all other four digit numbers, the “addition” rule from earlier is still valid:

1000 + 900 + 40 + 5 = millenovecentoquarantacinque (1945)

2000 + 18 = duemiladiciotto (2018)

5000 + 30 + 5 = cinquemilatrentacinque (5035)

 

1.000.000 = un milione (one million)

2.000.000 = due milioni (two million)

Note that 2 million technically becomes 2 millions (millioni) in Italian! This also holds true for 3 million, 4 million, 5 million, and so on.

 

1.000.000.000 = un miliardo (one billion)

2.000.000.000 = due miliardi (two billion)

 

EXPRESSION OF THE DAY:

DARE I NUMERI = to do or to say silly things

 

Now you know all the numbers in Italian! Ready for your next lesson? Here’s how to tell time in Italian!

Vediamo se hai appreso i contenuti di questa lezione! Prova a fare gli esercizi!

Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 20
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 13
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 7
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 132
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 1000
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 99
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 16
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 520
Scrivi il seguente numero a lettere: 2018

Leave us a comment if you have any doubts or if you want to tell us anything about the lesson! We will respond as soon as possible 😛

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