10 Italian PROVERBS & EXPRESSIONS about Marriage

Italy is a country full of customs and traditions that represent a cultural baggage of immesurable value. Some of these traditions are really clear in the rite of marriage, which is considered to be an important aspect of the italian culture. The celebration of this event says a lot about the customs and habits of a community, ethnicity or religion. In this article we are going to look at 10 Italian proverbs about marriage!

10 Proverbs to Learn the Italian Language

The rite of marriage has certainly changed consistently during the course of millennia, reflecting the culture and society of each age. But the habits and principles on which it is founded have remained unchanged nonetheless. In this instance, there are a lot of sayings and proverbs used by italian speakers. Let’s give a look at them!

1. TRA MOGLIE E MARITO NON METTERE IL DITO

It is not appropriate to inferfere with matters that regard the spouses.

The expression is considered to be an invitation to not express any comment or opinion regarding a private matter of this sort, because only the husband and the wife know about the details and the context.

Ho provato a dare un consiglio ad entrambi mentre litigavano, ma alla fine ho peggiorato la situazione! Ho imparato la lezione: tra moglie e marito non mettere il dito!

2. MOGLIE E BUOI DEI PAESI TUOI

It is better to marry a woman that comes from the same country/territory as we do.

The proverb probably originates from the peasant period, during which oxes represented the main source of income for a family and was thus convinient to buy the local ones to make sure of their quality. In the same way, finding a wife that comes from the same place as one does would have resulted in less issues for the wedding, since she would’ve shared the same customs and habits as her future husband.

This saying is used in a derogatory way, because it underlines the difference with people that come from a foreign country, in case of romantic relationships.

Luca diceva sempre “moglie e buoi dei paesi tuoi”, ma inaspettatamente si è innamorato durante il suo viaggio in Giappone e ora sta per sposare la sua fidanzata giapponese!

3. NÉ DI VENERE NÉ DI MARTE NÉ SI SPOSA NÉ SI PARTE (né si dà principio all’arte)

On Thursdays and Fridays you don’t get married, don’t go for a trip and don’t start new businesses, especially if they involve creativity.

According to this proverb, Thursday and Friday are the worst days to take on a new business. Thursday is the day of Mars, god of war, so any action may result in failure. Friday, on the other hand, is the day when evil spirits where supposedly created. It is a superstitious expression that is based on the concept of misfortune and for that reason it also involves marriage.

Marco e Sofia si sono sposati di venerdì 17 e ora stanno per divorziare. Non mi stupisce… Già il 17 porta sfortuna, in più di venerdì! Lo sanno tutti che né di Venere né di Marte né si sposa né si parte…

4. DIO LI FA E POI LI ACCOPPIA

Referring to a couple that is so similar and gets along so well that their union seems planned by God himself.

This proverb has ancient origins: two people that share many aspects of their character or passions, generally decide to spend the rest of their life toghether and get married. It is often used sarcastically, when two people (not necessarly being in a relationship) get into a lot trouble toghether.

Avevo invitato Giulia e Marco al cinema per guardare una commedia così divertente uscita qualche giorno fa, ma loro sono così noiosi e guardano solo i documentari… È proprio vero: Dio li fa e poi li accoppia!

5. MATRIMONIO ALL’IMPROVVISO, O INFERNO O PARADISO

A rushed marriage can have great or tragic results.

In this case the proverb underlines the fact that a rushed decision might have positive conquences (so much that they bring you to Heaven) or extremely negative (so much that they bring you to Hell) for the future of the marriage.

Giorgio e Stefania si sono conosciuti, frequentati e sposati nel giro di due mesi. Ma adesso non fanno altro che litigare e criticare i propri rispettivi difetti. È proprio vero quello che si dice: matrimonio all’improvviso, o inferno o paradiso!

6. SPOSA BAGNATA, SPOSA FORTUNATA

If it rains on the wedding day, the bride will be lucky, so the marriage will be a success.

Although it might not be so pleasant to get married on a rainy day, especially for the bride and her dress, the proverb is really clear: rain on a wedding day is a sign of prosperity and good fortune, to compensate for the misfortune that you had on the wedding day.

Piove a dirotto! Mi dispiace per Rosa e Matteo che oggi si sposano. Ma si sa che sposa bagnata, sposa fortunata. Ma sono sicura che il loro matrimonio sarà un successo: pieno di gioia e di soddisfazioni!

7. NON SI PUÒ AVERE LA BOTTE PIENA E LA MOGLIE UBRIACA

We cannot expect to have everything in life, we have to compromise.

The proverb refers to a person that expects to have everything, even things that naturally exclude one another. If you want a drunk wife, you can’t also have a full cask, since the wife drank all the wine.

This proverb indirectly reminds us that life is made of choices, selections and compromises. The use of this proverb is really general, so it is used in any context not only referring to marriage.

Giuseppe vuole un buon lavoro con uno stipendio alto ma anche tanto tempo libero, però non riesce a trovarlo. Ovviamente! Non si può avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca…

8. SE SON ROSE…FIORIRANNO

We don’t know what will happen in the future, but one thing’s for sure: to see the outcome we need time. Then, if something is destined to happen, it will.

According to this saying, which is among the most known, only time allows us to determine if something, like marriage, will have a positive outcome or not. As I was saying before, it is deeply connected to the idea of destiny and fate. If what you planted are in fact roses, they will bloom during the Spring.

Laura è uscita con Antonio sabato scorso. Sembra che la serata sia andata bene e che si siano divertiti. A me sembrano una bella coppia, ma vedremo… Se son rose, fioriranno!

9. CHI SI SOMIGLIA, SI PIGLIA

Do you remember “Dio li fa e poi li accoppia”? Well, this proverb is really similar to that one in its meaning: it indicates that it’s much easier to get along with people that are similar to us.

Which is to say, we tend to choose a person similar to us in their habits or tastes as a partner.

Paolo è un pazzo: fa bungee jumping, scala montagne, fa paracadutismo e anche immersioni! Però, la sua fidanzata ama l’avventura tanto quanto lui. Sono due folli, ma si amano: chi si somiglia, si piglia!

10. CHI NASCE È BELLO, CHI SI SPOSA È BUONO, CHI MUORE È SANTO

The proverb has religious origins and describes the life of a cristian: fist of all, it involves the fact that when we are born we give off a sense of purity, genuinity and beauty; then, if we get married, we conform to society and behave like good people, good cristians; it underlines the sanctity of marriage. With death, if we behaved well in life, we become saints because we go to Paradise…

Il suocero di Vincenzo è morto oggi. Era davvero una brava persona, amata da tutti. Sembrava il protagonista di quel famoso proverbio: chi nasce è bello, chi si sposa è buono, chi muore è santo.

It is fascinating how these sayings, although they have ancient origins and are so strongly traditional, still are commonly used in the italian language, especially the spoken one. Italians, as we know, are really traditional and a little superstitious.

If you love proverbs and want more of them, you have got to watch our video about 10 PROVERBS TO KNOW to speak italian like a native.

Do proverbs about marriage exist in your language or culture? It’s an argument I am really interested in, because weddings are deeply rooted in the traditions and culture of a country! Tell us about them in the comments!

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